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Video: Electromobility: changing cities and how we get around them

Published by on 06.05.2019 - 3 min

Over the course of just a few years, the development of electromobility has become a real social force, to such an extent that the electric car is gradually modifying urban planning and our travel habits in cities.

The environmental goals set for 2030 at the European scale*, which aim to reduce CO2 emissions, open the way for the large-scale development of electric vehicles.
The increase in the number of electric cars in city centres is gradually being followed by the development of public charging infrastructure. At the same time, it has become easier to install charging points in apartment blocks.
To encourage the production and use of low-carbon energy, wind turbines or photovoltaic solar panels installed on the roofs of homes can be connected to stationary energy battery storage systems, which give the batteries of electric vehicles a second life, after they have been used to power cars.
These batteries store the renewable energy produced by solar panels when the sun is shining or wind turbines when it is windy, and makes it available for the use of households or a community when demand for electricity is higher.

Urban mobility reimagined

An essential part of 21st century cities, the electric vehicle is able to freely navigate around urban areas without any driving restrictions.
Alongside buses, ride-hailing services, electric scooters and other personal mobility devices, the electric car is perfectly adapted to new forms of urban mobility like carsharing.
These new, connected modes of transportation promote a variety of uses and are seducing more and more city dwellers, improving their quality of life and making for less congested city centres.

*European Union member countries agreed on the goal of reducing CO2 emissions by 37.5% for passenger vehicles and by 31% for commercial vehicles by 2030, compared to 2021 levels.

Copyrights: Renault Communication

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